The 17-year-old kitchen worker in China has demonstrated impressive knife skills

Chinese chef does dangerous knife-spinning stunt

China World
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While some kitchen workers have a special talent with ingredients, others are extremely good with knives, such as this young sous-chef from China.

At just 17 years old, he has already impressed the Chinese public with his dangerous knife-spinning stunt.

The teenager, who calls himself Mo Aiai, stated.he taught himself how to ‘play with blades’ as a hobby after watching tutorials online.

The 17-year-old kitchen worker in China has demonstrated impressive knife skills

The 17-year-old kitchen worker in China has demonstrated impressive knife skills

He posts videos of himself doing the dangerous stunt on live-stream app Kuaishou

He posts videos of himself doing the dangerous stunt on live-stream app Kuaishou

That’s sharp! The 17-year-old kitchen worker in China has demonstrated impressive knife skills

The teen, who calls himself Mo Aiai, taught himself how to 'play with blades' as a hobby

The teen, who calls himself Mo Aiai, taught himself how to 'play with blades' as a hobby

Mo stated.he followed tutorials online

Mo stated.he followed tutorials online

Dangerous stunt: The teen, who calls himself Mo Aiai, taught himself the stunt as a hobby

Originally from Gansu Province in north-west China, Mo Aiai works in Beijing as a sous-chef. 

He told MailOnline that he only started out on his knife-spinning training two and a half months ago. But apparently, he has already reached an impressive level.

The young worker uploads videos of himself performing the skills almost daily on Chinese live-stream video app Kuaishou. He stated.he used the app because ‘it’s fun’.

In one clip filmed seven days ago, Mo demonstrated how to juggle a meat cleavers between his fingers with just one hand while blindfolded in his kitchen.

Mo remains modest about the video.

‘I’m not the best. There are many more people who could do it better than me on Kuaishou,’ Mo said. ‘My job is busy, so I do my training only when I have time.’

Mo warned viewers not to copy him without proper protection

Mo warned viewers not to copy him without proper protection

He stated.he often gets injured while practising the stunt

He stated.he often gets injured while practising the stunt

Don’t try this at home! Mo warned viewers not to copy him without proper protection

Originally from Gansu Province in north-west China, Mo, 17, works in Beijing as a sous-chef

Originally from Gansu Province in north-west China, Mo, 17, works in Beijing as a sous-chef

He stated.he went blindfolded when he was fully confident about his movements

He stated.he went blindfolded when he was fully confident about his movements

It’s a hobby! He stated.he went blindfolded when he was fully confident about his movements

He stated.he had practised the routine over and over again. He only put a cloth over his eyes when he was fully confident about his movements. He started slow before speeding up. 

Mo stated.he was not satisfied with the recording because he had apparently made a few mistakes. He also stated.he would not perform blindfolded in the future because ‘it was too dangerous’.

‘My hand was cut a few times during the process,’ he wrote on his Kuaishou. 

Mo warned the public to be cautious and not to try the dangerous stunt at home.

He stated.he often gets injured during his training. One time he got a serious cut on his left wrist and had to receive two stitches.  

Mo explained that he would like to carry on practising and filming himself doing the skills, but right now his biggest wish is to find a ‘well-paid job’ in Beijing.

Like Mo Aiai, millions of young people in China are demonstrating their unique and sometimes bizarre talents through live-stream apps and websites, hoping to find fame and fortune.

Tai Zi, the live-streaming director of Tunshou Entertainment in China, told MailOnline: ‘A good live-streaming entertainment host could easily earn one million yuan (£114,000) a month.’

However, the booming yet competitive industry has been slammed after some hosts went to extreme measures in order to grab the public’s attention.

Last December, a 26-year-old vlogger died while trying to film himself doing pull-ups on top of a 62-storey skyscraper.

In 2016, a 21-year-old woman was jailed for four years after live-streaming herself participating in an orgy online.

In the same year, the Chinese government had to ban ‘seductive’ consumption of bananas during webcam live-streams in an attempt to clamp down on ‘inappropriate and erotic’ content online. 

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