The incident allegedly transpired last fall with a career intelligence analyst briefing the commander-in-chief for the first time (Pictured: Friday, Jan. 12, 2018)

Trump ‘asked pretty Korean lady about her ethnicity’

General North Korea
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President Donald Trump allegedly questioned an aid of Asian heritage about her ethnicity and asked why she wasn’t in charge of negotiations with North Korean.

As stated by NBC News, the incident transpired last fall with a career intelligence analyst briefing the commander-in-chief for the first time. 

‘Where are you from?’ the president reportedly asked the hostage policy expert after their meeting, according to two officials with direct knowledge of the exchange.

The incident allegedly transpired last fall with a career intelligence analyst briefing the commander-in-chief for the first time (Pictured: Friday, Jan. 12, 2018)

The incident allegedly transpired last fall with a career intelligence analyst briefing the commander-in-chief for the first time (Pictured: Friday, Jan. 12, 2018)

The incident allegedly transpired last fall with a career intelligence analyst briefing the commander-in-chief for the first time (Pictured: Friday, Jan. 12, 2018)

Trump allegedly turned to an adviser in the room and asked why the 'pretty Korean lady' wasn't heading negotiations with Pyongyang (Pictured: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un)

Trump allegedly turned to an adviser in the room and asked why the 'pretty Korean lady' wasn't heading negotiations with Pyongyang (Pictured: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un)

Trump allegedly turned to an adviser in the room and asked why the ‘pretty Korean lady’ wasn’t heading negotiations with Pyongyang (Pictured: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un)

Manhattan, the same as the him, she replied.

Where are ‘your people’ from, Trump reportedly asked again, apparently unsatisfied with the answer. 

After informing the president that her parents were Korean, Trump allegedly turned to an adviser in the room and asked why the ‘pretty Korean lady’ isn’t negotiating with Pyongyang on the White House’s behalf, the two unnamed officials stated. 

This exchange was disclosed to NBC News in the wake of the President’s reported ‘s**thole countries’ remark made on Thursday in reference to immigrants from Haiti and Africa during a meeting at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Haitian-Americans march to mark the eighth anniversary of the Haitian earthquake, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, in Miami

Haitian-Americans march to mark the eighth anniversary of the Haitian earthquake, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, in Miami

Haitian-Americans march to mark the eighth anniversary of the Haitian earthquake, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, in Miami

The comments, first reported by The Washington Post, revived accusations that the President is ‘racist,’ with a history of bigoted statements aimed at Mexicans, Native Americans and certain groups from Africa among others.  

Trump posted on twitter a convoluted denial early Friday about the alleged comments, made during a closed door discussions with lawmakers on immigration reform.

‘The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used,’ with Trump denying he said ‘take them out’ in reference to Haitians, apparently addressing quotes printed by The Washington Post and The New York Times.

But Democratic Senator Dick Durbin – who was present at the meeting – publicly pushed back, saying Trump had repeatedly used ‘vile and racist’ language. 

A source close to the president told NBC News ‘he frequently uses that kind of language.’

The source who disclosed the meeting with the career hostage policy expert said the President’s remarks were most likely innocuous, but spoke of Trump’s lack of cultural sensitivity and decorum. 

Democratic Senator Dick Durbin (pictured) said Trump had repeatedly used 'vile and racist' language during their immigration meeting on Thursday

Democratic Senator Dick Durbin (pictured) said Trump had repeatedly used 'vile and racist' language during their immigration meeting on Thursday

Democratic Senator Dick Durbin (pictured) said Trump had repeatedly used ‘vile and racist’ language during their immigration meeting on Thursday

Trump’s history of making controversial comments about race

Trump has longed been accused of stoking racial tension by making incendiary comments about ethnic minorities while taking a delicate approach to white supremacists.

Before winning the 2016 president election, Trump spearheaded the so-called ‘birther movement’ which questioned then President Barack Obama’s place of birth. 

During the campaign, he suggested that some Mexican immigrants are ‘rapists’ and ‘bringing crime,’ while complaining that a judge presiding over a civil suit involving Trump couldn’t fairly arbitrate the case due to his Latino heritage.

Soon after his surprising upset win, Trump attempted to institute a travel ban aimed at keeping individuals from six Muslim majority countries from entering the United States, prompting outcries of Islamophobia. Last month, the Supreme ruled the administration was allowed to enforce the presidential order while it’s being challenged in courts.   

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) hosts members of the Native American code talkers during an event in the Oval Office of the White House, on November 27, 2017 

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) hosts members of the Native American code talkers during an event in the Oval Office of the White House, on November 27, 2017 

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) hosts members of the Native American code talkers during an event in the Oval Office of the White House, on November 27, 2017 

More recently, Trump was accused of insulting Navajo code talkers during a ceremony at the White House honoring their service. 

During the event, Trump took a swipe at Sen. Elizabeth Warren, referencing his designated nickname for the Massachusetts Democrat, ‘Pocahontas.’   

 Donald Trump has repeatedly referred to Sen. Elizabeth Warren (pictured) as 'Pocahontas,' angering many in the Native American community 

 Donald Trump has repeatedly referred to Sen. Elizabeth Warren (pictured) as 'Pocahontas,' angering many in the Native American community 

 Donald Trump has repeatedly referred to Sen. Elizabeth Warren (pictured) as ‘Pocahontas,’ angering many in the Native American community 

In August 2017, Trump appeared to draw a moral equivalence between neo-Nazi demonstrators and anti-racist counter protester following a violent clash in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Heather Heyer, 32, was killed and over 20 others were wounded after they were struck by a car driven by 20-year-old white supremacist James Fields, who police say intentionally plowed his Dodge into a crowd of activists protesting an alt-right rally. 

The Washington Post also reported that the President made disparaging remarks about Haitians during a meeting in June 2017, remarking they ‘all have AIDS.’

Trump added in that June meeting that immigrants from Nigeria, once they saw the United States, would never ‘go back to their huts,’ according to The New York Times. 

And Trump’s latest controversy came on Thursday, after The Washington Post reported that the President wanted more immigrants from Norway rather from ‘s**thole countries’ like Haiti and those in Africa.  

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters  during the 'Unite the Right' rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters  during the 'Unite the Right' rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the “alt-right” clash with counter-protesters  during the ‘Unite the Right’ rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia

 

  

  

 

 

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